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What are you thinking about Net Neutrality?

  • 1.  What are you thinking about Net Neutrality?

    Posted 12-20-2017 12:06
    Hello district leaders and Happy Holidays!
    Do you have any thoughts about how the loss of Net Neutrality will affect schools and what can be done about it?
    For instance, do you think districts will be able to demand contracts from ISP's that strictly prohibit blocking, throttling and paid prioritization?
    How would that solution differ between district uploads and downloads?
    Do you have any contractual language that could be used as an example?
    Do you think that there will be consortia that will leverage their larger bargaining position to do this?
    Other thoughts?


    ------------------------------
    Marie Bjerede
    Principal, Leadership Initiatvies
    Consortium for School Networking
    (503) 341-0566
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  • 2.  RE: What are you thinking about Net Neutrality?

    Posted 12-21-2017 07:00
    If net nutrality becomes to restrictive. It will drive schools to move faster into state educational fiber networks. In Michigan we currently have Fiber run to the 52 State ISD's. Some of the 52 ISD's have Fiber to each loacal school district. This network is currently starting to be used for intra state networking traffic with a handful of ISD piloting Internet to them over this network. We are positioned to peer to the network with the state colleges and they have developed a network interconnect to other states. So if they again get to restrictive, we have optiions. Net nutrality will just move use to accelerate the movement to a state education network. I believe there are other states positioned to do the same thing. Keep your options open!

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    Fred Sharpsteen MOISD
    Director of Technology
    Mecosta-Osceola ISD
    Big Rapids MI
    (231) 592-9601
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  • 3.  RE: What are you thinking about Net Neutrality?

    Posted 12-21-2017 07:29
    Lots of different thoughts.

    On the one hand, a state agency, MCNC.org acts as our ISP and has already issued a statement declaring they will continue to provide un-tiered levels of service to its customers.  As such, we expect no direct changes to teachers, students and staff on our network, unless exclusivity contracts are developed between content providers and ISPs.

    However, as we look at the digital divide among our student families, it looks quite probable that the issue will change from a binary choice (does the family have broadband Internet or not?) to a choice as to which carrier, which tier of Internet access and which performance level do they get with various web resources.  A classroom nightmare.

    I am concerned for a future in which teachers cannot confidently assign homework that relies on Internet resources, since it's unclear which students' families' Internet plans will support the necessary web-based resources.  This future view could include the wealthiest families able to afford deluxe plans which provide access to all Internet resources at equal speeds, while others have to pick and choose. Then again, certain ISPs may develop exclusive partnerships with major content providers, such that specific web resources are ONLY available with certain ISPs.  Our district has many neighborhoods in which there is only one broadband provider.  One would hope that the revenue increases the ISPs will leverage would allow them to further build out their infrastructure to light up neglected neighborhoods, but my cynical view is that the new revenue will find its way to shareholders rather than to bolster investment and growth.

    </soapbox>

    Todd E. Jones
    Chief Technology Officer
    Orange County Schools
    500 Orange High School Road
    Hillsborough, NC   27278
    office: (919) 245-4100  X15001
    mobile: (919) 245-1709

    District staff:
    • Check out our Intranet site for helpful information on technology support in the district
    • Use our Help Ticket system for quick resolution to your technology issues
    • Make sure to enroll in our Password Reset Tool so you can manage your passwords more easily






  • 4.  RE: What are you thinking about Net Neutrality?

    Posted 12-21-2017 10:48
    Todd Jones hit on the component that I have been thinking about.  Student access outside school, which is incredibly important, already very inequitable and likely to get worse / more complicated.

    It could be a matter of different service levels, different content delivery experiences, different pricing for those...  It could also lead to sudden disruptions due to fights between companies.  For example, if a major internet provider (cable or otherwise) has a falling out with a major content owner, could we see disruptions where that content is inaccessible for a period of time?

    I think we are unlikely to see breakdowns at the top Peering sites, but it isn't impossible.

    If a top MNO asks Google for $$ to keep fast access over their network to all of their content (including but not limited to educational resources and tools) - how would Google react?  Just say no?  Retaliate? Pay up and introduce new costs into their system?

    What if that same ask is made not of a single content provider, but of a Content Distribution Network (CDN)?  If an MNO slowed down access to anything on Akamai or AWS, it would impact thousands of sites/resources who would have little say in the outcome... jumping CDN's isn't a piece of cake...

    We will have to wait and see for much of this, but I believe that a LOT of it is outside the control of school districts, or even state networks.

    Michael

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    Michael Flood
    VP, Strategy @ Kajeet
    Board of Directors @ CoSN
    Raleigh, NC
    (678) 656-7512
    @michaelmflood
    http://www.kajeet.net
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: What are you thinking about Net Neutrality?

    Posted 12-21-2017 09:29

    EdSurge has a nice summary of possible scenarios (including a quote from Keith Krueger) affecting higher education, many of which apply to K – 12 and libraries as well.

     

    What has helped me wrap my head around the issue is considering the overall model of Internet delivery and possible outcomes. Our state CIO, Mark Raymond, rightly sees Internet access as akin to water, a necessity for many different aspects of life and where there is generally a limited or single supply based on your geography. The other metaphors (e.g., Internet access as entertainment, akin to cable bundles) remain limited, as they ignore the fundamental services that we all depend on:

     

    ·         Education

    ·         Electronic Government (e.g., paying taxes, DMV, unemployment benefits, etc.)

    ·         Financial Management

    ·         Work and Career Management

    ·         Healthcare

     

    Either charging public institutions for a fast lane connection or allowing other, private content providers to consume that fast lane poses a real threat to the above activities.

     

    Getting (finally) to Marie's question, we should consider the likely charges (A) to end users (e.g., a district paying a premium for G Suite access from its ISP) as well as (B) to content providers (that same ISP charging Google for fast delivery to districts). Both types of charges can and likely will take place. Districts nationwide are already working through collaboratives to help control costs, partnering with research and education networks such as ours in Connecticut (Connecticut Education Network). At that "macro" level of aggregated buying there is strength and influence to pressure tier-1 Internet providers to support net neutrality in practice.

     

    We should also look at a common phenomenon since last January, with the dismantling of federal controls and the rise of state oversight. Witness Jerry Brown of California negotiating climate agreements in China the day after the U.S. exited the Paris Agreement. We will see the same activity at the state level, so it behooves us to express our concerns with our legislatures and attorneys general to ensure access to content that supports public institutions and the general citizenry.


    Douglas Casey

    Executive Director

    Commission for Educational Technology

    State of Connecticut

    55 Farmington Avenue

    Hartford, CT 06105

    (860) 622-2224

    Doug.Casey@ct.gov">Doug.Casey@ct.gov

    www.ct.gov/ctedtech

    @CTEdTech

    CT

     






  • 6.  RE: What are you thinking about Net Neutrality?

    Posted 01-03-2018 15:43
      |   view attached
    Thank you all for your insights!  I have put them together in a blog post that will be published next week.


    For members only - sneak peek today!  We want members to have access first.

    ------------------------------
    Marie Bjerede
    Principal, Leadership Initiatives
    Consortium for School Networking
    (503) 341-0566
    ------------------------------

    Attachment(s)



  • 7.  RE: What are you thinking about Net Neutrality?

    Posted 01-08-2018 13:26
    just a reminder that you may want to open the blog and get a preview of our advice in a Post-Net Neutrality world.  See message from Marie Bjerede from last week with attachment.  It includes tips on contract language and other advice.

    ------------------------------
    Keith Krueger
    Chief Executive Officer
    Consortium for School Networking
    Washington DC
    (202) 861-2676
    keith@cosn.org
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: What are you thinking about Net Neutrality?

    Posted 01-09-2018 08:04
    I'm imagining a nightmare scenario in which teachers no longer look at students' digital divide in binary terms (does the student have access to the Internet at home or not?) into one in which teachers have to wonder what ISP each student's family has, what tier of access they have with that ISP and whether or not the teacher can assign homework that relies on Internet-based resources that some families may have and other's not.

    Todd E. Jones
    Chief Technology Officer
    Orange County Schools
    500 Orange High School Road
    Hillsborough, NC   27278
    office: (919) 245-4100  X15001
    mobile: (919) 245-1709

    District staff:
    • Check out our Intranet site for helpful information on technology support in the district
    • Use our Help Ticket system for quick resolution to your technology issues
    • Make sure to enroll in our Password Reset Tool so you can manage your passwords more easily